THE DECLINE AND FALL OF ROMAN LONDON ARCHAEOLOGY VIRTUAL WALK

Reconstruction of Dark age London
Reconstruction of Dark Age London


Thursday 13th May April 2021 6.30pm

An exploration of what happened at the end of the Roman Period, and how the City became first deserted, and then a Saxon, German speaking English City.

The first British Brexit?   The Roman Britons kicked out the Romans in 407AD, and, soon, asked them to come back after a catastrophic collapse.  Faced with plaque, civil war, invasion, mass immigration,  industrial decline, reversion to barter; the authorities struggled against anarchy and descent into a Dark Age.

But was that how it was?  Wasn’t it a rather a transition into the Late Antique period in which life for most people went on much as before except paying taxes to local rulers rather than distant Romans? This virtual walk explores why the Roman system in London broke down, and what really was the impact of the end of the Roman system in London?
What is the evidence?  and can we trust it? Or can we really do nothing much more than guess? 

We tramp the virtual streets of London in search of light to shine on the Dark Ages in London.

This is a London Walks event by Kevin Flude, ex Museum of London Archaeology and Museum Curator

To Book:

Introductory podcast (note the walk is on Thursday 6.30 13th Mary 2021)

Restarting Real, Physical Guided Walks!

Kevin Flude leading a guided walk on the South Bank
Kevin Flude leading a guided walk on the South Bank

The good news is that I am starting doing real physical Guided Walks again at the end of May.  We are going to start giving an Archaeology walk every Thursday evening at 6.30.   I am sharing them with a colleague, Leo Heaton.  She is doing the first on on the 20th May, and I am doing the second on the 27th May.  Later we plan to do another walk in the afternoon.  I am also putting together a series of special, repertory walks for London walks running throughout the summer.  To book click here

PREHISTORIC SITES IN THE LONDON AREA

London before the Romans
View of London from the SE as it might have looked before the Roman Invasion

In researching my Prehistoric Virtual Walk (Sunday 25/04/21 Details) I came across many great sites of interest. Here are a few

Barn Elms – London’s Oppidum?

This is a lecture by Alex Barnes – only 15 minutes, long and about a site in South West London that just might be an important Iron Age centre of power, which might explain all that great metalwork found in the River Thames over the centuries.

Barn Elms talk

The Early River Thames – the Iron Age and Before

This is a lecture by Jon Cotton in the Gresham College Series.

Gives interesting insights.

The Early River Thames

Horton Neolithic Houses

I don’t know how I missed this site, as it was reported in archaeological magazines I read, but it is an amazing multi-period site in the Thames Valley. Excavations before gravel extraction have shown a particularly amazing sequence of Neolithic and Bronze Age discoveries.

They found 4 or 5 early Neolithic Houses, about 15% of those that have been found in the entire UK, and an amazing placed deposit, which contained a collection of objects dating back thousands of years. In effect, a ‘museum’ collection.

I’ll let you read it from the horse’s mouth. To read click here.

Screenshot of Wessex Archaeology's page on the excavations of Kingsmede Quarry, Horton.

LONDON BEFORE LONDON – PREHISTORIC LONDON VIRTUAL WALK

This has been a long time coming and only made possible by the need to go Virtual during the Pandemic. I have never done a prehistoric walk around London as such. I have done sections of it, and given lectures on the subject. But they were mostly overviews. This has therefore been a challenge putting this together, but a necessary revision of my knowledge.

So please do join me on:

Sunday 25th April 2021 6.30pm

An exploration of London before the foundation of Londinium

It was long thought that London was founded by a Trojan Exile in the Late Bronze Age. But historical analysis and archaeological excavation gradually demoted the idea to a myth.

On this tour we explore what was in the London area before the Romans. We begin at Heathrow and tour Greater London for evidence from the Paleolithic to the invasion of the Emperor Claudius.

We concentrate on the period since the introduction of farming, and bring together evidence for the prehistoric Kingdoms that controlled the area on the eve of the Invasion. We look for henges, barrows, hill forts, hut circles and look at genetic evidence for identity of prehistoric Londoners. The tour will end in the City.

This is a London Walks event by Kevin Flude, ex Museum of London Archaeology and Museum Curator

To book

VIRTUAL GUIDED WALKS COMING UP

MAY 2021

Reconstruction of Dark Age London Bridge
London in the 5th Century Reconstruction painting.

THE DECLINE AND FALL OF ROMAN LONDON ARCHAEOLOGY VIRTUAL WALK

Thursday 13th May 2021 6.30pm

An exploration of what happened at the end of the Roman Period, and how the City became deserted, and then, reborn as an English City.

To book

THE LONDON OF THOMAS MORE AND THOMAS CROMWELL.

THE CITY OF WOLF HALL VIRTUAL BOAT TRIP AND WALK

Sunday 16 May 2021 6.30pm

We begin on the River touring by boat the Tudor Palaces that were the backdrop to the drama of Henry’s Court. We then walk around the City to find where the two Thomases lived and died.

To book

JANE AUSTEN’S VIRTUAL LONDON – A PICTURE OF LONDON 1809 WALK

Sunday 23rd May 2021 6.30pm

With the help of a contemporary Guide Book, her letters, and works we explore Austen’s London

To book

THE FINANCIAL CITY FROM SLAVERY TO HEDGE FUND VIRTUAL WALK

SUNDAY 30th May 2021 6.30pm

A Virtual Walk in the historic City of London on the development of the Financial City from 16th Century t?o the present day

To book

Reconstruction of the newly discovered Thermopolium at Pompeii

posted on YouTube by Pablo Aparicio.

Salon Issue 466 from the Society of Antiquaries says:

‘Choices for dinner from this thermopolium would have included duck, goat, pig, fish, and land snails, all of which were found in the deep terracotta jars embedded in the stone counter. It appears that wine was also on offer; fava beans, which were used to modify the taste of wine, were been found in a different container.’

CHAUCER’S MEDIEVAL LONDON VIRTUAL WALK.

The Canterbury Pilgrims PAINTINGS painting Blake, William (1757 – 1827, English) Painting entitled ‘The Canterbury Pilgrims’, by William Blake PC.89


Saturday 20 February 2021 7.00pm

A Virtual Walk around Medieval London following in the footsteps of its resident medieval poet – Geoffrey Chaucer

One of the spectators at the Peasants Revolt was Geoffrey Chaucer, born in the Vintry area of London, who rose to be a diplomat, a Courtier and London’s Customs Officer. He lived with his wife in the Chamber above the Gate in the City Wall at Aldgate. His poetry shows a rugged, joyous medieval England including many scenes reflecting life in London. His stories document the ending of the feudal system, growing dissatisfaction with the corruption in the Church, and shows the robust independence with which the English led their lives.

His work helped change the fashion from poetry in French or Latin to acceptance of the English language as suitable literary language. This was helped by the growth of literacy in London as its Merchants and Guildsmen became increasingly successful. In 1422, for example, the Brewers decided to keep their records in English ‘as there are many of our craft who have the knowledge of reading and writing in the English idiom.’

Chaucer and other poets such as Langland give a vivid portrait of Medieval London which was dynamic, successful but also torn by crisis such as the Lollard challenge to Catholic hegemony, and the Peasants who revolted against oppression as the ruling classes struggled to resist the increased independence of the working people following the Black Death.

A walk which explores London in the Middle Ages, We begin at Aldgate, and follow Chaucer from his home to his place of work at the Customs House, and then to St Thomas Chapel on London Bridge, and through London to Poultry, Bucklersbury and Cheapside before visiting the Guildhall and St Pauls. We will walk in the muddy City Streets, exploring the unhealthy conditions and poverty amidst great riches and pageantry.

This is a London Walks event by Kevin Flude

To Book:

New Discovery about Stonehenge

20th Century Photo of Stonehenge stones being propped up
Photo of Museum display at Stonehenge, showing 20th Century repair work at Stonehenge

The discovery of a dismantled Stone Circle, the same size as the Aubrey Holes Circle at Stonehenge, near to the Quarry that modern science has identified as the source of the Bluestones at Stonehenge, has validated what Geoffrey of Monmouth said in the 12th Century.

That is that Stonehenge was second hand and was brought from the West. (OK he said Ireland and the newly discovered Henge is in West Wales, and everything else he said seems to be wrong). But at least it would seem Geoffrey didn’t just make up it all up, which is what I have been saying for many years.

Anyway the point of this post is to direct you to this article which is the definitive word on the new discovery by Mike Parker Pearson and his colleagues.

Do read it!